Northeastern Field Botany at Its Best: June 19-23, 2011, Ithaca

Joint the Botanical Society of America – Northeastern Section for this year’s field extravaganza with:

Torrey Botanical Society

Philadelphia Botanical Club

Cosponsored with:

The Finger Lakes Native Plant Society

New York Flora Association

 

June 19-23, 2011 (Sunday-Thursday) at Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York

The 2011 Field Meeting will examine the flora of Tompkins County and
vicinity in upstate New York. Housing will be on the campus of Ithaca
College, at the southern edge of the city of Ithaca. Located at the
southern end of Lake Cayuga, Ithaca is in the heart of the extremely
scenic Finger Lakes region. The city is home to the campus of Cornell
University, including the Cornell Plantations, a remarkable botanical
garden and arboretum as well as owner of numerous natural areas.
Tompkins County also is renowned for three state parks with magnificent
gorges and waterfalls, plus many additional designated natural areas
that are open to the public.

Accommodations are in double-occupancy dormitory rooms of Ithaca
College. The rooms are in “traditional style residence halls” (non-air
conditioned rooms, shared bath facilities). Also, there are several
nearby motels. Participants wishing to stay in a motel will need to make
their own arrangements. Box lunches are included for each day of field
trips (Monday through Wednesday). Also included are two breakfasts and a
buffet dinner. The remaining meals will be purchased individually at a
food court on the campus, or at nearby restaurants and stores, since the
campus dining hall will not be open. Transportation will be by a rented
bus and by car-pooling.

Our field trip coordinator and leader is Mr. David Werier of the Finger
Lakes Native Plant Society and the New York Flora Association. The sites
he has chosen represent a diversity of vegetation types and will include

• Lime Hollow Nature Center, Marl Ponds, and Chicago Bog: acidic bog,
limy marl ponds, rich woods;

• Bear Swamp Sempronius: calcareous rich shrub fen, cool rich northern
forests;

• Michigan Hollow: sedge meadows, rich peat swamp, rich and acidic woods;

• Thatcher’s Pinnacles and Biodiversity Preserve: rich forests with
older trees, terminal moraine

deposits, steep slope with native red pine, dry rim with dwarfed
southern-affinity forests;

• Taughannock Falls State Park: impressive gorge and waterfall, rich
forests, talus slopes;

• South Hill Swamp Natural Area: swamp white oak swamp, diversity of
sedges.

In place of the first two, we may include these recommendations from Mr.
F. Robert Wesley, Natural Areas Manager at the Cornell Plantations:

• Landers’ Corners Bog: /Carex pauciflora/, /Listera australis,/
/Orontium aquaticum/;

• Jam Pond Bog: large open bog surrounded by red maple-black
spruce-tamarack peatland forest.

There will also be a variety of evening lectures. An optional informal
trip to the Cornell Plantations is planned for the morning after the
meeting on Thursday June 23.

For a registration form click on this link.

For further information contact:

Larry Klotz, Chair: lhklot@ship.edu
or

Robynn Shannon, Co-chair: rndshannon@cox.net

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