Archive for the ‘Education and Research’ category

Plants Are Cool Too Episode 3 – Skunk Cabbage

April 26, 2013

This episode takes place in our own backyard;  Plattsburgh!

 

New Tree ID Videos Available from SUNY ESF

August 3, 2012

Folks interested in trees,

Christopher Baycura (ITS office at ESF) and I recently added 35 tree vignettes to this YouTube site:

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBE1197A3397CAE00&feature=plcp

for a total of 135 tree species covered, typically in about 2 minute HD videos that briefly summarize how to identify each tree, its ecological characteristics, importance, and whatever else came to mind. The list of native and non-native trees covered is attached. We’ve covered most of the trees that one would encounter in the woods or in landscapes in upstate NY and throughout the Northeast, and all the trees covered in my dendrology course that are cold hardy in CNY (many western US tree species). These vignettes are also all available for free on i-Tunes. Please feel free to share this information and link to others who might be interested.

Don Leopold

Saratoga Springs Tree Survey Off To a Great Start

May 1, 2012

Here is an update from Tom Denny on this important project:

On April 21, in celebration of Earth Day weekend, Sustainable Saratoga’s Urban Forestry Project launched our 2012 tree survey season.  The threatening weather held off and we had seventy-five passionate volunteers sign in, which doesn’t even include the nice turnout of kids who came with their families.  You can count ‘em in the attached photo, taken under one of Saratoga’s legacy American elms.  (A special thanks to Commissioners Michele Madigan and Chris Mathiesen, as well as Supervisor Joanne Yepsen, for their participation.)  It was festive, it was fun, it was gratifying, it was educational, and it was productive.  The energy was phenomenal and we accomplished a great deal in one day.  Many dedicated volunteers worked from 10 AM until the rain chased them in about 3 PM.  We followed that up with additional training sessions on the evenings of April 23 and 24, which placed nearly thirty additional volunteers into the field.  All in all, over 100 volunteers hit the streets counting trees this week, with an additional fifty having expressed willingness but not yet having attended a training session.  A huge thanks to all  !  This offers a strong sign of how greatly the citizens value our urban trees!

The tree survey is Sustainable Saratoga’s in-kind contribution to the City’s responsibilities under a DEC Urban Forestry grant it applied for a few years ago.  The DEC initially expected the City to pay $20,000 in matching funds to hire an external consultant to conduct the survey.  Sustainable Saratoga offered to organize the survey and analyze the data on a volunteer basis, and saved the taxpayers the $20,000.  The DEC grant enables the City to develop its first-ever Tree Master Plan.  Sustainable Saratoga will take the survey data, crunch its numbers through a forestry software called iTree, and produce a report that quantifies the economic and environmental  benefits of Saratoga’s urban forest.   This will provide the foundation for the City’s plan.

In addition to the survey work, we provided participants on April 21 with instructions for three tree-related activities:  a self-guided walking tour (with location and DBH) of seven majestic elm survivors in downtown Saratoga (and the survey has just turned up an eighth);  a self-guided walking tree hunt of the varied trees of Congress Park; and a call to the public to tell us their stories about Saratoga’s biggest, best, or just plain favorite trees (send your favorites to saratogatreesurvey@gmail.com).  The self-guided tours are available by request at the same email address.

Many hands do indeed make light work.  At the end of 2011, we had surveyed only about 23% of the survey area.  Early work done this spring had inched us up to almost exactly a quarter of the survey completed.  Since the April 21 launch event, the 100+ volunteers have already completed another 25% (we are now 50% finished) and have in their hands, actively being surveyed as I write, virtually all of the remaining 50%.  We expect to complete the original survey work by early May and have decided, given the enthusiastic response by the volunteers, to expand our survey area to include additional sections of the city.  Of course, completing the survey will not be the end of our efforts; it will really be more the beginning of an era of strong tree advocacy in Saratoga.    For more information, check our website http://www.sustainablesaratoga.com/about-us/initiatives/the-urban-forestry-project/ or Like us on Facebook, at Sustainable Saratoga’s Urban Forestry Project (email: forestbaum@gmail.com).

What were some of the most interesting impressions that volunteer surveyors brought back from the streets?  Some great trees were noted, including a “new” legacy American elm on Nelson Avenue, some large basswood trees, some great oaks, and a beautiful slippery elm.  Many ventured into tree wastelands and returned to us shocked by the sheer number of treeless streets (or virtually treeless streets) in Saratoga.  Finally, the lack of tree diversity was a recurrent observation from the front lines.  In particular, volunteers noted the preponderance of recently planted Norway maples (green leaf and Crimson King) and Bradford pears, all of which are on the DEC interim Invasive Species List.

Happy Volunteers Ready to Survey Trees

Botanists Becoming Endangered Species

March 2, 2012

An alarming trend has been identified in natural areas management—and it has nothing to do with climate change! However, it does involve the potential loss of a ‘keystone species’ in the natural areas field: the botanist.”  Natural Areas News 2012

A recent study and report by the Natural Areas Association identifies the plight of botany in the U.S. – some which we know all too well. A New York botanist recently said, “Frankly, it’s probably already too late, as we’ve lost the key generation that should have carried real botanical knowledge across the gap to the present.” Let’s hope not.

There is also a list of recommendations. For the report CLICK HERE.

Botanist John Wiley surveys for endangered plants along Seneca Lake. Are botanists endangered too?

DEC’s Saratoga Tree Nursery Kicks Off Annual Tree And Shrub Seedling Sale And Giveaway

February 14, 2012

From the DEC Press Release:

Landowners Can Take Advantage of Low-Cost Native Plants, Schools Can Get Them Free.

More than 50 species of trees and shrubs are now available to schools and public and private landowners at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) Saratoga Tree Nursery, DEC announced today. The Saratoga Tree Nursery provides trees for erosion control, wildlife habitat, reforestation and other uses.  For further information CLICK HERE.

Staff working at the Saratoga Tree Nursery (DEC photo)

Saratoga Springs Street Tree Inventory Needs Volunteers

February 13, 2012

Starting in May the Saratoga Springs Street Tree inventory is looking for volunteers to help complete the survey by the end of June. There is a minimum of 10 hours of volunteer time and training on identification and recording will be provided. If you are interested contact Rick Fenton at 518-421-7098 or fenton@nycap.rr.com.

Sugar Maple on Sugar Packet Not Right

February 8, 2012

Below is a photo from a Domino sugar packet distributed by Ginsbergs Foods of Hudson, NY from a series that features state symbols. Hmmm, does that look like a sugar maple leaf to you? We hope they get it right the next time, especially since they are a New York company. – Steve Young

Money Avaliable for College Students Studying Aquatic Plant Management

November 28, 2011

The Northeast Aquatic Plant Management Society (NEAPMS) has graduate scholarships and undergraduate stipends available for students working on projects in the field of aquatic plant management.  Projects from students working within the Northeastern area of the United States are welcome, though projects from students outside of the region may be eligible if the project they are working on relates to an aquatic plant issue within this region.

More information on eligibility requirements, how to apply, and rating criteria can be found on the NEAPMS website at https://neapms.net/scholarship.php.  Summaries of past projects are also highlighted on the site as well.

Flora Novae Angliae – published!

November 8, 2011

Arthur Haines’s Flora Novae Angliae (A manual for the identification of native and naturalized tracheophytes of New England) has been published. This work is one of the most important floristic works covering New England to ever be published. Although not covering New York this book will be still prove extremely useful in New York due to the similarity of the flora between the two regions. It will provide New York botanists with a much needed modern treatment of tracheophytes of the region and is a must have publication. Thank you Arthur for all your hard work! For detail see this link.

New York Natural History Conference Coming Next April in Syracuse

October 25, 2011

Next year’s conference, April 15-19, stands to be even better than the one in Albany last spring.  All you botanists out there should plan to participate.  See the information below. Click on it twice for a larger version.

CLICK HERE to go right to their conference website.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 273 other followers