Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ category

Binoculars Aren’t Just For Birders

October 19, 2014

I have found over the years that binoculars have become an indispensable part of botanizing for me. When I need to see plants that are inaccessible on foot or surveying an area by car, my binoculars let me see plants that I cannot get close to. Leaves high up in a tree, fruits way up on a vine, plants on a cliff, in the center of a deep marsh. All of these situations are helped by having a good pair of binoculars. If you turn them upside down and look the other way they can serve as a magnifying lens for looking at plant parts close-up. Take my advice and always have a pair of binoculars when you botanize. Oh yea, they are good for watching birds too.

Steve Young, NYFA

University of Guelph offers online courses in Sustainable Urban Agriculture and Horticulture

August 27, 2012

The University of Guelph offers online courses in Sustainable Urban Agriculture and Horticulture. Six courses are offered this Fall starting on September 10, 2012 including:

 

  • Naturalizing and Restoring Urban Gardens covers practice and theory to convert degraded urban greenspace into ecologically functional areas using native plant species and ecological principles. Students will learn the processes involved in planning and restoring naturalized areas, design, site planning and soil preparation, plant selection and maintenance.

 

Individual courses can be taken for general interest or work towards one or both certificates. Program and course descriptions are available on the website www.UrbanHort.ca or contact info@coles.uoguelph.ca or 519-767-5000.

Adirondack Shingle Shanty Preserve Announces Two Summer Field Courses

April 15, 2012

Adirondack Wetland Plants and Plant Communities
August 6-10, 2012
Instructor: Jerry Jenkins
The course will explore the structure, relationships, and identification of about 100 characteristic plants in 5 major wetland communities on the Shingle Shanty Preserve; ecology of dominant species; wetland structure and dynamics; climate change, acid deposition, and other conservation issues affecting wetlands.
Jerry Jenkins is a researcher with the Wildlife Conservation Society that has over 40 years of experience as a field botanist, educator and researcher in the Northern Forest. He has authored and co‐authored numerous books, technical reports and field guides including Climate Change in the Adirondacks and The Adirondack Atlas.

Fantastic Fungi of the Adirondacks
August 21-25, 2012
Instructor: Rick Van de Poll, Ph.D.
This short course on mycology will introduce the beginner and amateur
mushroomer to the intricate world of higher fungi in the Adirondacks. For beginners, this course will introduce basic ecological concepts as well as the major macro‐fungi groups. For someone familiar with these basic groups of mushrooms as well as their role in nature, this course will take the learner deeper into the realm of taxonomy by using fresh specimens and diagnostic keys. Dr. Rick Van de Poll is the principal of Ecosystem Management Consultants (EMC) of Sandwich, New Hampshire. He
has recorded over 1300 mushrooms in New Hampshire, including a number of undescribed species. After studying with Dr. Harry Thiers at San Francisco State University for 2 years, he taught mycology at Antioch New England from 1985 to 2001, and currently teaches mycology as an adjunct
faculty at Plymouth State University.

For further information, or to register, contact:

Stephen Langdon, Project Manager
Shingle Shanty Preserve and Research Station
shingleshantyresearch@gmail.com
(518) 593-5723

Shingle Shanty Preserve and Research Station, is a 15,000-acre biological
field research station in the Adirondacks. www.shingleshanty.org

Location of the Preserve

News About the Status of Butternut From Perdue University

August 8, 2011

From Keith Woeste, U.S. Forest Service Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC)

Dear Friends of butternut;

This letter and THIS CLICKABLE PDF FILE are about butternut (Juglans cinerea).  We are providing them to keep you informed about what is happening with butternut and butternut-related research, especially at Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC).  HTIRC is research collaboration between the USDA Forest Service (Northern Research Station) and Purdue University (http://www.HTIRC.org).

The PDF file contains a description of the mission of HTIRC with respect to butternut, some photos, descriptions of ongoing butternut research, and links to some butternut-related websites.

Many hundreds of foresters, biologists, naturalists and landowners have contacted HTIRC over the past 10 years about butternut.  I cannot thank you enough for your pictures and samples and other contributions to our work.  I have only ‘met’ most of you by email after you contacted HTIRC.   In some cases, your interest and willingness to help were so great that our staff and resources were overwhelmed by the volume of samples and requests.  As a consequence, at times I didn’t reply to some inquiries in a timely manner or with all the data you requested.  I am sorry for that, and I wish I had more time and resources to offer.  Butternut canker is only one of many threats to the sustainability of the eastern hardwood forest, a resource we all value.  At a time when funds are scarce, the best way forward is to communicate and cooperate.  We do want to hear from you if you have thoughts about research priorities or research opportunities, or if you have resources that may help.

There is no “Butternut Society” or other organized group especially for butternut recovery—at least none that I am aware of.  So for now, we will do our best to keep you informed with periodic letters and updates to our website.  There is much to do if we are to succeed in keeping butternut a vital part of the eastern hardwood forest.  We improve our chances if we all pull together. We expect that updates about butternut will be provided on an occasional basis—certainly no more frequently than twice each year.

Write to me at woeste@purdue.edu if you have any questions or need additional information.  My complete contact information is below. Please share this information with anyone who you think will be interested in it.

Yours sincerely,

Keith Woeste

U.S. Forest Service Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC)

Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Pfendler Hall, Purdue University

715 West State Street, West Lafayette IN 47907-2061

web: http://www.agriculture.purdue.edu/fnr/HTIRC/woeste.html

phone: 765-496-6808

Northeastern Field Botany at Its Best: June 19-23, 2011, Ithaca

February 21, 2011

Joint the Botanical Society of America – Northeastern Section for this year’s field extravaganza with:

Torrey Botanical Society

Philadelphia Botanical Club

Cosponsored with:

The Finger Lakes Native Plant Society

New York Flora Association

 

June 19-23, 2011 (Sunday-Thursday) at Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York

The 2011 Field Meeting will examine the flora of Tompkins County and
vicinity in upstate New York. Housing will be on the campus of Ithaca
College, at the southern edge of the city of Ithaca. Located at the
southern end of Lake Cayuga, Ithaca is in the heart of the extremely
scenic Finger Lakes region. The city is home to the campus of Cornell
University, including the Cornell Plantations, a remarkable botanical
garden and arboretum as well as owner of numerous natural areas.
Tompkins County also is renowned for three state parks with magnificent
gorges and waterfalls, plus many additional designated natural areas
that are open to the public.

Accommodations are in double-occupancy dormitory rooms of Ithaca
College. The rooms are in “traditional style residence halls” (non-air
conditioned rooms, shared bath facilities). Also, there are several
nearby motels. Participants wishing to stay in a motel will need to make
their own arrangements. Box lunches are included for each day of field
trips (Monday through Wednesday). Also included are two breakfasts and a
buffet dinner. The remaining meals will be purchased individually at a
food court on the campus, or at nearby restaurants and stores, since the
campus dining hall will not be open. Transportation will be by a rented
bus and by car-pooling.

Our field trip coordinator and leader is Mr. David Werier of the Finger
Lakes Native Plant Society and the New York Flora Association. The sites
he has chosen represent a diversity of vegetation types and will include

• Lime Hollow Nature Center, Marl Ponds, and Chicago Bog: acidic bog,
limy marl ponds, rich woods;

• Bear Swamp Sempronius: calcareous rich shrub fen, cool rich northern
forests;

• Michigan Hollow: sedge meadows, rich peat swamp, rich and acidic woods;

• Thatcher’s Pinnacles and Biodiversity Preserve: rich forests with
older trees, terminal moraine

deposits, steep slope with native red pine, dry rim with dwarfed
southern-affinity forests;

• Taughannock Falls State Park: impressive gorge and waterfall, rich
forests, talus slopes;

• South Hill Swamp Natural Area: swamp white oak swamp, diversity of
sedges.

In place of the first two, we may include these recommendations from Mr.
F. Robert Wesley, Natural Areas Manager at the Cornell Plantations:

• Landers’ Corners Bog: /Carex pauciflora/, /Listera australis,/
/Orontium aquaticum/;

• Jam Pond Bog: large open bog surrounded by red maple-black
spruce-tamarack peatland forest.

There will also be a variety of evening lectures. An optional informal
trip to the Cornell Plantations is planned for the morning after the
meeting on Thursday June 23.

For a registration form click on this link.

For further information contact:

Larry Klotz, Chair: lhklot@ship.edu
or

Robynn Shannon, Co-chair: rndshannon@cox.net

An Interactive Visual Identification Key to Carices of North America

February 15, 2011

Now you have no excuse to not learn more about the genus Carex in New York with the release of this new identification key.  It is a stunning assemblage of photos and drawings of the species of Carex in North America. You can sort them multiple ways, starting with New York, and even compare two species. The photos are high resolution so you can zoom way in on the spikelets. It would be nice if there were photos with the key characters identified on the photo. The website is HERE but you can view a short video on its features below. You will need Microsoft Silverlight on your computer to get it to work. – Steve Young

Pennsylvania Rare Plant Forum to be Held April 9, 2011

February 8, 2011

PENNSYLVANIA RARE PLANT FORUM

9:30 AM-about 2:30 PM

Saturday, 9 April 2011

Jennings Environmental Education Center

12 miles north-west of Butler, on PA Route 528 just west of Route 8

40.9° N 80.1° W, Elevation 350 m

All people interested in the conservation of Pennsylvania’s native flora are encouraged to attend this meeting. The Rare Plant Forum is a function of the Vascular Plant Technical Committee of the Pennsylvania Biological Survey, and for over thirty years has served in an advisory role to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for issues related to the conservation of the native flora of Pennsylvania. In addition to discussing proposed changes to the list of Plants of Special Concern in Pennsylvania (POSCIP), there will be a few related presentations. This is an excellent opportunity to connect and work with other botanists, amateur and professional, who share your interest in the flora of Pennsylvania.

It is fitting for us to meet at a facility named for Otto E. Jennings, late Curator of Botany at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and early advocate of native plant conservation. If you know of people who might be interested in attending, especially in NW Pennsylvania or adjacent parts of Ohio and New York, please extend this invitation to them.

The proposal form is in an Excel spreadsheet, downloadable at http://www.paconserve.org/256. Related documents such as the definitions of the status categories and the minutes from past meetings are also available here. Please start working on your proposals right away, as John Kunsman and I will need some lead time to help gather the data. Please submit your proposals by 4 March. Proposals will be posted to the above url shortly after I receive them, and a summary will be distributed at least a week before the meeting along with an agenda.

Presentations

You are encouraged to consider presenting on recent work you have done related to the conservation of the flora of our region. One of the advantages of holding the Rare Plant Forum is the opportunity to share the results of our work. This can increase the value of your work by allowing others to build upon it. It also encourages collaboration and minimizes duplication of effort. Email or call me with the subject and how much time you would like.

There will be time on the agenda for un-premeditated announcements, but it helps me plan if I have some idea how many there will be, so let me know if you can.

Dinner on Friday

Some of us will be having dinner on Friday at North Country Brewing in Slippery Rock. Let me know (sgrund@paconserve.org) if you would like to join us; I will make a reservation.

River Running!

Some of us are going to take advantage of the spring thaw on Sunday to explore a local stream, probably Wolf Creek. WPC owns land at Wolf Creek Narrows where we can take out and botanize. It is one of the best spring wildflower sites in the Commonwealth. Some experienced whitewater enthusiasts might brave Slippery Rock Creek Gorge. Email me if you are interested.

Camping

We have reserved the Muskrat Cove group camping site at Moraine State Park for Friday and Saturday (http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/parks/moraine/moraine_mini.pdf). This will be primitive camping with water, but no hot water. The cost will be $10/night divided between everyone who camps. Please contact Kelly Sitch at c-ksitch@state.pa.us if you are interested.

See you soon! – Steve

Steve Grund

Chair, Pennsylvania Rare Plant Forum

Botanist, Pennsylvania Natural Heritage Program

Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

800 Waterfront Drive

Pittsburgh, PA 15222

sgrund@paconserve.org

(412) 586-2350

www.paconserve.org


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