Is Nodding Trillium (Trillium cernuum) Becoming More Rare in New York?

Steve Young at the NY Natural Heritage Program would like to know if you have seen nodding trillium lately.  There is some discussion among NY botanists that it is becoming more rare in New York and may be in trouble.  If you know of any populations of this trillium with nodding white flowers let Steve know at young@nynhp.org. Historically it was known from many spots from Long Island, up the Hudson Valley and west to the Niagara Region, primarily along the limestone belts. See the map from the cards at the State Museum below.

Map of Trillium cernuum sites in NY. NYS Museum cards.

Photo by Ben Russell, Univ. of Wisconsin herbarium website.

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5 Comments on “Is Nodding Trillium (Trillium cernuum) Becoming More Rare in New York?”

  1. Susanne T. Lorbeer Says:

    I have seen a population of Trillium cernuum within Bear Swamp State Forest. The most recent time I saw it there was last Spring (2010). I estimate that there are more than 100 individual plants at this location. It is off trail, but near a trail, and probably safe from being run over by skiers.

  2. Kenneth Hull Says:

    I found nodding trilliums in Nelson Swamp 5/27/09.


  3. The first Nodding Trillium I ever found was at Orra Phelps Nature Preserve, about 5 years ago. I haven’t found it there since, though.

  4. nyflora Says:

    The one dot on this map from Saratoga County was a collection made by Ora Phelps in 1926 from “Saratoga Springs.”


  5. I used to find Nodding Trillium growing abundantly along Bog Meadow Trail near Saratoga Springs, but one summer all the leaves got mowed down and it now struggles to come back, with just a couple blooming last year. I don’t understand the compulsion to mow trails wide enough for a semi to pass through. They got the Rattlesnake Plantain too, just as it was about to bloom. I’ve contacted the caretakers of this trail, and together we’ve marked off the sensitive sites that the mowers must avoid.

    I’m very interested to learn the response to this post.


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